Cactus cross stitch gardens and more!

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One crafter’s journey into the world of succulent and cactus cross stitch design…

As an enthusiastic cactus and succulent collector, I’m well used to getting excited about such obscure terms as ‘elephant toe’, ‘Medusa’s hair’, ‘birthday cactus’, ‘blue echeveria rose’ and ‘lithops’. Several years ago, I had an enormous collection of happy plants which bred and spread to family and friend’s houses. My mother ended up with a monster – a giant brain cactus which kept enlarging like some sort of sulking alien organ and refused to settle down, even when all of the other cacti eventually dried up one particularly roasting Australian summer.

I still keep a collection of the more unusual ones today, however I’ve come to appreciate no-maintenance cactus gardens, such as artificial plants and artistic impressions. Though cacti and succulents ARE generally low maintenance, for some reason I was still having to shift pots into shade constantly in summer and then shift them into the rain in winter (the real ones required more care than was first thought). Living in a rental with concrete and fencing reflecting extreme radiation on them was not something I had thought about much.

My wonderful crochet cactus garden took about a month to make.
My wonderful crochet cactus garden took about a month to make.

I started decorating my house with fake cacti and succulents and found them to be quite lovely, and best of all, NO maintenance was required, ever! Not only did they sit there and do their thing, but they made the place look far more green and attractive. Combined with bits of driftwood, gemstones and shells, I started a new themed look in my loungeroom, based around nature and this was enhanced with cacti cushions, cacti prints and heaps of other stuff. It was a look that was to inspire me for the next decade – I highly recommend it (it’s so classical you’ll never want to change it).

One of my framed cactus cross stitch planter patterns.
One of my framed cactus cross stitch planter patterns.

Anyway, one day I was surfing on Etsy and stumbled across crochet cacti. For those who don’t know, crafters have been busy making crochet cacti tutorials for quite some time and they are rather beautiful – excitingly coloured and Mexican looking. They were awesome! I wanted to make one! YES, TOTALLY, I WAS GOING FOR IT!!! (enough with the exclamation marks, but that’s how I felt at the time, not having done any personal craft projects for months). So I went for it, but being the perfectionist that I am, I had to design my own cactus garden, entirely from scratch (because, hey, if I was going to live with my creation for the next fifty years, I might as well capture my entire essence with it and reflect my glorified creative soul back at myself). Hence, my new cactus crochet garden was born.

Cactus and succulent cross stitch patterns
The full set of crochet-inspired cactus and succulent patterns.

Shortly after making the project, I started up a cross stitch pattern shop on Etsy and was inspired so much by my crocheted cacti that I decided to design some brightly coloured and Mexican inspired cactus cross stitch patterns to sell, based upon the crocheted items. I’m pretty pleased with the results!

A cactus inspired Mexican bookmark cross stitch pattern.
A cactus inspired Mexican bookmark cross stitch pattern.

I’ve finished a series of three of the cactus planter boxes in frames to go with the cross stitch bookmark, and I’m planning some other incidental items yet to come too. All of my patterns are hand stitched to get the best frame fit and colouring and are available on this website and in my Etsy shop – I hope they inspire you as much as they inspire me.

And best of all – NONE OF THEM EVER NEED WATERING!

How to cross stitch

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Want to learn how to cross stitch?

This is a step-by-step guide on how to cross stitch for beginners. Learn what materials to buy, how to start cross stitching, prevent knots, sew backstitch and work a pattern from start to finish with professional tips. This article will teach you the traditional basic method of doing cross stitch embroidery needlework. For the purpose of this tutorial, we will be using the Ulysses butterfly cross stitch pattern, but you can use any pattern you like.

Introduction

Cross stitch is a relaxing hobby that is easy to learn and affordable to make. At Lucky Star Stitches, pattern specifications are on the individual website page where the pattern is listed for sale. This tells you what cross stitch fabric to buy, how many colours there are and what skill level it is. If you are brand new to cross stitch, pick a ‘beginner’ cross stitch pattern with less colours and minimal or no backstitch.

Materials

To create a finished cross stitch, you will need the following items:

  • Aida fabric
  • DMC embroidery floss
  • Tapestry needle
  • Wooden embroidery hoop frame
  • Sharp scissors
  • Coloured texta
  • One pin
  • Printed out cross stitch pattern

Aida Fabric
Aida is a brand name. You can get many brands of cross stitch fabric and it doesn’t matter which one you buy, but Aida is a standard brand to get. The fabric should look like the fabric in the photo below. It comes in different ‘counts’ – the smaller the count, the smaller the ‘boxes’ in the fabric. Hence, beginners are better off starting with 14 count Aida fabric or a higher count, for larger size boxes to work with. Buy a colour that you think will suit the cross stitch pattern.

Aida fabric.
White 14 count Aida fabric.

Tapestry Needle
You will need a tapestry needle to make cross stitch, in a size that fits the holes of your Aida fabric. For 14 count Aida, buy a size 24 tapestry needle.

Tapestry needle.
Tapestry needle.

DMC Floss
‘Floss’ is the embroidery thread used to sew the actual cross stitches. DMC is the best quality and most well known brand of thread to use. Other brands (Semco, Anchor etc) are cheaper, but you’ll need to check the DMC equivalent number on the label to get the right colours. DMC have a standard universal colour system, where each colour has its own number and these numbers are used worldwide in cross stitch patterns. Semco, Anchor etc have their own colour numbering systems but these aren’t the same numbers as DMC.

Example DMC list contained in the printed pattern.
Example DMC key in the printed pattern.

Print out the cross stitch pattern and take the list of required DMC colours to a craft shop. Buy all of the DMC colours listed, or their equivalents. You can also buy floss winders to wrap the thread on and floss boxes to keep the winders neatly stored for future cross stitch projects (but only do this if you’re thinking of crafting more than one project).

Organising your embroidery threads onto floss winders and into floss storage containers.
Hoop Frame
The hoop frame is a useful tool for sewing the cross stitch and is also used to present it nicely at the end. Hoop frames come in different sizes and your Lucky Star pattern specification will tell you which size you need. Hoop frames are usually measured in diameter, so a 6” hoop frame will be 6” across the width of the centre of the frame. Hoop frames with a screw/bolt at the top are preferred, especially if you want to decorate the frame later.

Wooden embroidery hoop frame.
Wooden embroidery hoop frame.

Preparation

Cut the fabric
Lay your hoop frame on top of the Aida fabric and cut a square around it, leaving a large 3” border of fabric on the four sides. If your fabric is creased or won’t sit flat, iron it first.

Cutting the Aida fabric.
Cutting the Aida fabric.

Mark the exact centre
Fold your fabric into quarters and put your tapestry needle through the centre ‘box’. This marks the exact centre of the fabric for working. This isn’t the visual centre, which we’ll talk about later, but you do need to mark the exact centre for working.

Marking the exact centre with your tapestry needle.
Marking the centre with your tapestry needle.

Hoop the fabric
Unfold the fabric and place it in the hoop frame, doing up the screw on top of the hoop frame to tighten the fabric in the frame. Leave the tapestry needle still in the centre ‘box’. There is no right or wrong side of the fabric until you start stitching.

Insert the Aida into the hoop
Insert the Aida into the hoop.

Mark the first stitch
Locate the centre on your cross stitch pattern (by following the arrows on edge of the pattern with your finger – don’t mark it like I have in the photo). The centre on the pattern matches where the centre is in your hoop frame.

Marking the centre stitch.
Marking the centre stitch.

Cross stitch is traditionally sewn from left to right, top to bottom. Locate the leftmost, topmost stitch in your pattern. You need to count from the centre how many boxes to go up and how many boxes to go left to reach the starting topmost leftmost stitch. There’s no need to mark it on the pattern like I have, but you can make a note somewhere if you like. Count it twice on the pattern to make sure you’re correct, then count it twice on the fabric to find the starting box. Insert a pin to mark it.

Mark the first stitch with a pin.
Mark the first stitch with a pin.

Beginning The Cross Stitch

Find the floss colour required for the first leftmost topmost stitch in your pattern key (the bit with the symbols/colours). Cut a 30cm length of floss and separate it into two parts (three strands in each part).

There are six strands in each floss and different amounts of them are used depending on what count size your Aida fabric is. For 14 count Aida, two or three strands works well. Take the tapestry needle out of the centre of your hoop frame and thread it with the three strands just like they’re one thread. Do not knot the end of your thread.

Separate the floss - NOTE: separate into two strands, not three.
Separate the floss.

Attaching The Thread

Attaching the thread.
Attaching the thread.

(1) The pin marking the starting stitch location. (2) Flip over the hoop frame to the reverse side and locate the pinned box. (3) Remove the pin while marking the box with your finger. You will sew the thread through the nearest horizontal warp. (4) Without going through to the front of the fabric, hold the end of the thread with your fingertip to do so. (5) Leave a 1cm thread tail. Sew again twice more. (6) When you look at the front of the fabric, you should have a slight hint of thread showing and this marks the starting box.

Stitching The First Row

Stitching the first row.
Stitching the first row.

(1) Flip the hoop to the front side and (2) stitch diagonally from the bottom left to the top right of each box, following the row in your pattern. My butterfly pattern says I need to stitch three boxes in the first row, but your pattern may be different. (6) When you’ve finished however many stitches/boxes are indicated in your pattern’s first row, start working back along the row by going from bottom right to top left.

Stitching The Second Row

The second row.
The second row.

(1) Finishing the first row. (2) When you’ve finished the row, you should have some neat looking crosses in the boxes. This is cross stitching! (3) Mark off the first line of your pattern with a texta and do the second line. (4) Bring the needle up through the bottom left of the box where the second line starts and repeat the process of the first line. (6) Do the amount of stitches as shown in your pattern.

Ending & Attaching Thread

Attaching more thread.
Attaching more thread.

(1) When you’ve stitched enough rows that your thread runs out, simply repeat the process of sewing the thread through the nearest horizontal warp on the back of the fabric, only this time you’ll do it inside the existing cross stitch instead of using an empty box. (2) Sew the three stitches and cut off the thread, leaving a 1cm tail. (3) Start a new thread the same way as you initially did, choosing a new warp inside the cross stitch area, stitching three times through it and leaving a 1cm tail. (4) The back of the work can get a little messy, but that’s OK. (5) Continue stitching on the front, following your pattern.

Skipping Boxes

Every now and then, you’ll see that cross stitch patterns skip boxes. This is normal and often happens and you just need to match skipping the boxes in the pattern with your actual stitching. To do this, instead of starting at the bottom left of the next box as you stitch from left to right, move the needle across, skipping however many boxes your pattern indicates. The photo below shows how I skipped two boxes in the second last row. Please read The Golden Rule below for more information about this.

I skipped two boxes in the second last row.
I skipped two boxes in the second last row.

The Golden Rule

In cross stitch, there is a Golden Rule to follow to keep your work of a high standard and to avoid a messier back. It is: do not skip more than three boxes in a row when you need to leave a gap. You can see in the below photo that there is a gap of four boxes before the next ‘L’ stitch. It breaks the Golden Rule, so we don’t stitch it. It will either be stitched at a later time in a later row, or we add a new thread and stitch that section separately (later).

This box is too far away to stitch.
This box is too far away to stitch.

Working Other Rows As You Go

Working with two rows to get to the unfinished boxes.
Working with two rows to get to the unfinished boxes.

Sometimes, it’s possible in the next three rows to do the stitches that weren’t done previously. For example, (1) I started stitching the next row. (2) And on the row after it, I was able to go up a row to do the undone stitches (3-4) and do them. (5) Then I finished the original row. (6) I marked off the lot on my pattern. Feel free to do this, but you still can’t skip more than three boxes/rows/columns to go to the undone stitches (the Golden Rule still applies).

You can also work other rows below your current row, as well as above. This photo shows an extra row stitched below the current row, because it won’t be able to be stitched in the normal manner due to the Golden Rule.

Stitching down a row to reach potentially unfinished stitches.
Stitching down a row to reach potentially unfinished stitches.

Attaching A New Colour

Sew through a horizontal warp inside existing stitching, like the photo below, to start the next colour (end the previous thread first). Since you’re working from left to right generally for the whole cross stitch, there is usually some stitching in place where you need it. If there isn’t, you’ll need to add the thread on a blank box warp, but doing it is generally not ideal and should be avoided except where there is no other choice.

Attaching a new colour.
Attaching a new colour.

Errors & Mistakes

Sometimes you might make a mistake and sew too many or not enough boxes in a row. Simply remove the needle from the thread, then use the needle to poke through the top thread of the last box done and pull it to undo it. Do this across the row from right to left and then from left to right until you can thread the needle again and fix the error. Even with errors done on previous rows, it is possible with lots of patience to undo them using this method.

Undoing stitches to correct an error.
Undoing stitches to correct an error.

Here’s an example of how the back of your work should look. It’s messy, but you can see that there are clear vertical lines where the cross stitch is and that there are no looped knots, bumps or long threads breaking the Golden Rule.

The back of your cross stitch should look a bit like this.
The back of your cross stitch should look a bit like this.

Preventing Knots

As you work, the thread twists and this can cause knots. To prevent knots, when the thread is on the front of the work, lift the hoop up and let the thread suspend towards the ground. The thread will unwind itself. You can help it along by pulling on the thread end nearest the needle to unwind the top (see arrow) and then let it go. It’s good practise to do this occasionally!

The easiest way to untwist thread and prevent knots.
The easiest way to untwist thread and prevent knots.

Undoing Knots

Knots are an inevitable part of doing cross stitch. Some knots can be undone easily (see photo) and others cannot. If you have a knot like the one below, put your needle through the loop and pull up firmly, away from the thread end coming out of the fabric. The knot should grow smaller (you might need to hold the thread with one hand, while pulling firmly with the needle in the other hand). Remove the needle, then pull firmly on both ends of the thread. The little knot should vanish.

This is a common type of knot and is easy to undo.
This is a common type of knot and is easy to undo.

Knots which cannot be undone should be removed by cutting off the knot, ending the thread and attaching a new thread to continue. Occasionally you might get a very small permanent knot (ie 1mm or less in size) and you can still keep going with these, as long as it doesn’t leave a big lump or appear on the front of the fabric.

Backstitch

Backstitch.
Backstitch.

Backstitch is done at the end, when the rest of the pattern has been stitched. (1) It is indicated by lines instead of squares on the pattern. (2) Choose one strand of floss for a thin backstitch or two strands for a thicker one and attach thread. (3) Start the backstitch at the end closest to the main stitched area – where thread can be attached neatly, the usual way. (4) Backstitch is a running stitch. Stitch it according to the pattern, going in and out of the fabric. (5) Then, go back the way you came, filling in all the gaps. (6) Do the next line of backstitch if there is one and end thread when complete.

Progression

Here’s an example of how I worked my cross stitch. The rows are always stitched from left to right, but the colour progression order across the cross stitch is up to you. I like to work in a general left to right, top to bottom progression, but I also like to finish whole coloured sections one at a time. You can see that it would be a lot easier to do sections based on colour rather than finish the top left wing completely, then doing the bottom left wing completely and so on.

My progression of the butterfly cross stitch.
My progression of the butterfly cross stitch.

I started the black part of the top right wing by counting the pattern and the fabric and adding the thread in a blank box, just like how we began the cross stitch. It was easier to do it this way than to start in the middle of the right wing somewhere and work both up and down the rows required.

Iron Your Finished Cross Stitch

When you’ve done all the stitching indicated on the pattern, remove it from the hoop frame. Iron the back of the cross stitch (so the front doesn’t get damaged). You can press on a high setting such as a cotton setting and use steam if you like. Some people like to use a teatowel in between the iron and and the cross stitch but I find it more effective without one, as long as the iron is clean.

Add The Hoop Frame

Unscrew the top part on your hoop frame so it’s looser and place the top of the frame over the ironed cross stitch, with the inner ring underneath. Try to put the finished cross stitch in the centre of the frame (this is known as the visual centre, which is different to the working centre we started with). You can hold up the hoop parts to the light to get a better idea of what looks centred if it helps. Tighten the screw on the hoop frame. Congratulations, hopefully you’ve now learned how to do cross stitch!

Decorative Frames

If you want the frame to look as pretty as the one below, check out my Decorative Hoop Frame Wrapping Tutorial for complete step-by-step instructions.

How to cross stitch
The finished cross stitch, with a decorative hoop frame.

LSS features in Cross Stitch Crazy magazine

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Cross Stitch Crazy is a UK based magazine for avid cross stitchers, containing lots of patterns and projects and is published monthly. Lucky Star Stitches projects were featured in issues #222 October (Track it down / Chart choice – Christmas trees) and issue #223 November (3 of the best…festive stockings). A big thank you to Alison Maney, who discovered the Lucky Star Stitches Etsy shop and suggested publication of the items.

October Issue #222
October Issue #222
November Issue #223
November Issue #223

Immediate Media Co., also publishes The World Of Cross Stitching, Cross Stitch Gold, Cross Stitch Favourites, Enjoy Cross Stitch, Love Crafting and Homestyle Sewing, among their many magazines. Reaching over 18 million consumers worldwide, they are a leading media business publishing multi-platform special interest content.

For more information on Immediate Media Co., please visit:
http://www.immediate.co.uk/

To check out Cross Stitch Crazy, visit:
http://www.cross-stitching.com/magazines/cross-stitch-crazy

For the love of needlework…

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Hi there!

My name is Pippa, and I’m a creative and crafty lady from Melbourne, Australia who loves to make stuff. I’m inspired by a love of colour, handcrafting and the world around us to produce beautiful things for adornment, decoration and nesting.

I’m a lifelong embroiderer, sewer, beader, painter and yarn addict. My first job was as a cross stitch sampler and I became immersed in the production of handcrafts full time, running market stalls and Etsy shops, while making commissioned works for different venues. I have won awards for cross stitch at local agricultural shows in Geelong and Melbourne and enjoy socialising, cooking and home decorating. I’m also interested in interiors, ceramics, miniatures and antiques.

This geometrical heart shows an optical illusion when stitched.
This geometrical heart shows an optical illusion when stitched.
A favourite pair of distressed jeans that I photograph the cross stitch on.
A favourite pair of distressed jeans that I photograph the cross stitch on.

In 2015, I opened my fourth Etsy shop and named it Lucky Star Cross Stitch Patterns. A year later, I renamed it Lucky Star Stitches.

At Lucky Star Stitches, I pride myself on stitching all of the patterns and making all of the tutorials so I can offer you a quality, finished product that’s been handmade and practically tested. The photo you see in the pattern listing is photographed as a real, finished item that’s been created by me with love and care. I make crafts physically to ensure you get the best colour combinations, techniques, fit, size and use.

Each digital pattern or tutorial comes as an instant download PDF, allowing you to shop wherever you want for materials and to save on labour and postage costs that would normally inhibit the price of purchasing actual finished physical goods.

I hope you are inspired by my range of handcrafted digital goods!